Archive for the ‘CIBC Mellon’ Tag

The virtue of strategic consistency

“Adapt or die” may be one of the most over-hyped business phrases of the last decade. The reality is that most firms don’t face disruptive threats. And seasoned leaders understand the serious business risks of poorly designed transformations.

Fortunately, there is another way to ensure competitiveness and growth. Companies that stay true to a winning corporate strategy over the long run can be very successful. How do you do this, especially when unforeseen internal and external events test your convictions?

In an ideal world, leaders craft and follow a clear, compelling and multi-year strategic plan. Realistically, this approach often doesn’t survive more than a few quarters. Headwinds such as slowing customer demand, rising costs, or competitive moves often spur managers on to increase spending, or to make deep cuts. In essence, leaders overreact to short-term noise instead of focusing on the long-term market.

Furthermore, organizational dynamics can lead to management prematurely hitting the panic button. These include:

  1. Some leadership practices have a built-in bias towards quick reactions at the expense of deliberation and patience;
  1. The need to hit short-term metrics to meet goals creates incentives to do things at any cost;
  1. Without the anchor of an existing strategy or priorities, it’s easy for companies to zigzag with no clear direction.

All of this can lead to operational distraction, wasted investment, high employee turnover and a compromised brand image.

Staying the course

Consistency pays off over time. And companies that stick with a good plan will become more efficient and develop better relationships with customers and partners. Importantly, there is no trade-off between speed and deliberation in a strategically consistent business. Staying the course also enables quicker decision-making and follow-through.

Canadian telecom provider Telus Corp. has successfully used strategic consistency. Telus’s focus on service, brand and culture helped it outperform its rivals during the last 15 years, according to a strategy+business article published on Aug. 31. During this time, the Vancouver-based company’s revenue more than doubled to $12 billion and it returned 351 percent to shareholders, making it a global leader in the sector, the article stated.

Staying the course is particularly important in business services, where clients measure performance over years, or decades. For example, the investment-servicing company CIBC Mellon built profitable market share by remaining true to its goals of focusing on clients and reliability.

“Consistency over the long term has been critical to earning the trust of our clients,” said Claire Johnson, senior vice president, strategic initiatives. “Choosing the right strategy and supporting it through ever improving products and services is the key to long-term market success and customer satisfaction.”

Becoming strategically consistent

Any organization can maintain strategic coherency. Here’s how Telus and others have made it work:

1. Define values

Leaders need to define the winning strategic values (i.e. how the company competes and with what capabilities) that work for their firm and use these to guide important decisions and actions over the long term.

2. Take a long-term view

Compensation programs and reporting tools should prioritize long-term shareholder value creation and reflect the performance of key strategic values.

3. Encourage clear leadership

Every employee, supplier and shareholder takes his or her cue from what leaders say, and more importantly, do.  When short-term emergencies arise, managers need to have the patience, support and fortitude to focus on what is truly vital.

4. Understand the relationship between time and change

New events, competitive moves, or technologies often encourage a short-term overreaction at the expense of more deliberate thinking and prudence. Remember what Bill Gates said: “We always overestimate the change that will occur in the next two years and underestimate the change that will occur in the next ten.”

Mitchell Osak is managing director, strategic advisory services at Grant Thornton LLP

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Improving joint venture performance

Over the past 20 years, Joint Ventures (JV) have become a popular form of business structure.   There are many types of JVs but each share a basic premise: separate businesses agree to develop, for a finite time, a new entity and new assets through the contribution of equity and resources. The partners exercise control over the enterprise and consequently share revenues, expenses and assets.

Although difficult to get an accurate tally, there are likely more than 8,000 JVs in existence worldwide representing hundreds of billions of dollars in combined revenues. JVs have been the preferred strategy for North American and European companies to enter the rapidly growing BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, China) markets.

When operating well, JVs deliver compelling benefits including simplifying entry into new markets, reducing business risk and conserving scarce capital. 

The operant phrase is, “when functioning well.”  JVs are not easy to form, operate and exit. A number of studies by KPMG, McKinsey and PWC have concluded that no more than 50% of all JVs were seen to be successful by their participants, with the average partnership lasting between 8 and 10 years. For those JVs that soldier on, they often suffer from strategic confusion, slow decision-making, and duplication of effort with the parents.

Two successful JVs provide some important lessons on creating and managing these unique relationships.  CIBC Mellon, a leader in the Canadian Asset Servicing industry, is a successful 14 year JV between the CIBC and Bank of New York Mellon.  Sony and Ericsson created a JV s in 2001 to manufacture mobile phones.  In 2009, Sony Ericsson was the 4th largest mobile phone manufacture in the World.

The following are some key lessons on creating and managing well-run JVs:

 Finding the right partner

  • Look for similar goal, and cultures – Not only must the firm’s culture and business practices be amenable to collaboration but it must have what Tom MacMillan, Chairman of CIBC Mellon, calls “the JV mindset…Some companies are good at working with others, some aren’t” 
  • Ensure a strategic fit – When prospective partners are identified, managers must evaluate the firm’s capabilities, management and financial health against the JV’s needs and their own gaps. In Sony Ericsson’s case, the JV combined Sony’s well-honed consumer electronics expertise with Ericsson’s leading technological knowledge in the communications sector.

 Reaching the right agreement

  • Get a strong business case – A winning JV combines a compelling business case with financially-strong partners.  “Two lousy businesses put together will not make one good business…they will give you one big lousy business.” Says Tom MacMillan.
  • Align around goals, commitments and mutual expectations – To avert conflict and ensure proper resource allocation, all parties must ensure their strategic and financial interests are in sync before commencing operations. To ensure strategic and financial alignment, both Sony and Ericsson agreed in the JV to stop making their own mobile phones.
  • Get the right equity and capital deal – Research says that a 50/50 equity split, with clear responsibilities and rights on both partners, has the greatest chance of success. 

Making the partnership flourish

  • Assign effective leaders – Senior management at both the parents and JV must be skilled at managing through differences in reward systems, cultures and organizational practices.   According to Tom MacMillan, strong Board-level leadership by the partners and day-to-day leadership in the JV may be the most critical factor in ensuring the JV’s success
  • Insist on mutual commitments –  Both partners must honour and maintain their financial and operational commitments even when results are less than ideal or the strategic circumstances of one party changes. This puts an onus on properly capitalizing the JV at the outset and dealing with future investment requirements.
  • Get the governance model right – The ideal governance structure provides sufficient controls to minimize risk without stifling operational flexibility and speed.
  • Anticipate and pre-empt conflict – According to a PWC study, the top 2 reasons why JVs fail are poor financial performance and a change in strategy.  To pre-empt surprises and illuminate important issues, JVs need regular strategic reviews and performance tracking.  Building in transparency and regular management communications will help foster trust and reinforce shared goals.

For more information on services and work, please visit the Quanta Consulting Inc. web site.