Gamification boosts customer engagement at Insurance firm


What is more boring, but useful, than learning about your workplace RRSP plan? What is more fun, but useless, than playing games at work?

“We regularly look outside our industry for innovative ways to help our customers learn more about retirement savings,” says Nadia Darwish, vice president, Market Development at Sun Life Financial. “Gamification was a natural fit.”

Gamification is less convoluted than the word implies. Essentially, the idea is to combine the basic appeal of video games — purpose, competition and the desire for mastery — with behavioral psychology to increase revenue. This could mean improving productivity, enhancing engagement or increasing sales.

Ms. Darwish and her team released an online game called Money Up in late 2014. Money Up features “missions” exploring the basics of retirement planning, investment asset allocation and different financial products. Players are quizzed about what they’ve learned before they can proceed to the next level and, like a classic arcade game, there is a leaderboard so employees know how they stack up against their colleagues.

The business results exceeded management’s expectations, Ms. Darwish says, generating significant improvements in participation, contributions and product penetration. She attributes success to the game’s seamless integration with Sun Life’s broader “financial literacy” program and is particularly happy that Money Up reached “the unique Generation Y audience in a way that resonates with them.”

Making simple, functional games is easier today than ever before. With a modest investment, a behaviour-changing game can be designed, tested and released within six months. Here are five tips for developing a gamification strategy based on the experience of Ms. Darwish and her team:

Don’t treat gamification like a side project. Gamification must be considered a strategic initiative and should incorporate input from senior leaders.

  • Don’t gamify in a silo. Adopt a collaborative approach by soliciting feedback from both internal and external stakeholders at every stage of development.
  • Don’t lose sight of your goal. Work backwards from your desired result (e.g. educate customers) to ensure that your game is more than just fun.
  • Don’t lose sight of your audience. Put the needs of your potential players ahead of your messaging by developing a product for them, not you.
  • Don’t set it and forget it. Monitor performance and solicit customer feedback after launch in order to develop fixes and improvements on the fly.

When a gamification strategy fails, it’s rarely for lack of enthusiasm. Here are three common pitfalls:

  1. Uncertain ownership. It can be difficult to determine who should ‘own’ a project that necessarily spans multiple departments within an organization.
  2. Narrow thinking. It can be difficult to articulate a compelling business case for something with which an organization has no prior exposure.
  3. Lack of knowhow. It can be difficult to develop a successful gamification strategy without experience in game design and behavioural psychology.

But the potential benefits of gamification are too significant to throw the baby out with the bathwater. The trick is tempering ambitious vision with lean resource allocation and a willingness to pivot along the way to mitigate risk and keep the project within its intended scope.

For more information on our services and work, please visit the Quanta Consulting Inc. web site

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