The Internet of Things is here


We are entering the age of the “Internet of Things,” where sensors, computers and devices are connected in a self-managing ecosystem. At home, this could mean your alarm clock communicating with your coffee maker or your thermostat communicating with your window blinds. In business, this could mean your barcode scanners communicating with your suppliers or your assembly lines communicating with to your repairmen.

In other words, the Internet of Things automates an entire activity, such as building management, medical diagnostics, logistics or manufacturing.

For example, Apple has developed an Internet of Things ecosystem that enables various devices to communicate with each other with the express goal of one day “owning the living room.” Google is also aiming to enter the space by developing driverless cars and increasingly sophisticated remote home monitoring systems.

Some of the technological drivers behind The Internet of Things include: the rise of affordable, high-performance computing, the availability of inexpensive and accurate sensors, widespread access to high-speed wifi, the emergence of sophisticated algorithms and the ability to tie everything together through software interfaces.

The Internet of Things affords tremendous opportunities for increasing productivity, inventing new services and freeing up human capital to re-focus efforts on strategic rather than menial initiatives. Firms that are first movers in the space and that are able to develop the right business models will not only resolve big customer problems and cut costs but also recast the markets in which they operate.

In short: The Internet of Things is coming to every market that has been — or can be — digitized.

Case Study: Sahara Force India Formula One

Competing in the Formula One circuit is one of the most challenging and technologically advanced undertakings in the world. Increasingly, advantage goes to the team that can better leverage insight drawn from data generated in practice and during races to execute real-time enhancements to the car and provide critical information to the driver.

That’s why Sahara Force India partnered with Univa, a cloud-technology vendor, to create an integrated, closed-loop platform of sensor feedback, advanced data collection and analysis and on-the-fly hardware and software optimization.

“Sahara Force India is second-to-none in pushing boundaries to achieve speed, innovation and capability,” says Gary Tyreman, chief executive of Univa. “Leveraging the Internet of Things enables SFI to reduce development engineering time and money, and take in-race performance to levels which once were considered impossible.”

Here’s how it works: The Sahara Force India analytics team monitors and models car performance in race conditions, generating more than one terabyte of data over the course of a typical race. Trackside engineers and the driver then use insight derived from this influx of information to adjust things such as brake sensitivity and suspension, thereby improving car performance and informing seasonal development plans.

This raises an important point. The Internet of Things requires more than an investment in connectivity-enabled hardware and software. It also requires developing the human knowhow to manage, draw insight from and optimize the system based on the data that’s being captured.

How you can benefit from the Internet of Things

For many firms, the Internet of Things poses a significant threat due to its disruptive nature. For others, it stands as a significant opportunity to outflank the competition. But regardless of how each firm reacts to the rise of the Internet of Things, the fact remains: every company will be affected. This is because the need to serve customers better, faster, with greater ease and at a lower cost will invariably spur Internet of Things investments and strategies.

With that in mind, here are five things you should consider before implementing an Internet of Things strategy:

  1. List the current and emerging needs of customers, suppliers and distributors that your firm is not currently equipped to provide.
  2. Identify how an Internet of Things offering might address those issues and generate value within your enterprise and market. For example, you may want to improve your understanding of customer behaviour in order to improve service.
  3. Think more broadly about an Internet of Things offering than bottom line impact. How could it position your firm for future competitiveness?
  4. Consider your potential Internet of Things offering in terms of its key components: software, hardware and people. Can you leverage existing resources to cut costs?
  5. Analyze how your organization would need to be restructured in order to deliver a successful Internet of Things offering.

For more information on our services and work, please visit the Quanta Consulting Inc. web site

Internet of Things offering than bottom line impact. How could it position your firm for future competitiveness?

Consider your potential Internet of Things offering in terms of its key components: software, hardware and people. Can you leverage existing resources to cut costs?
Analyze how your organization would need to be restructured in order to deliver a successful Internet of Things offering.

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