Archive for February, 2015|Monthly archive page

What business leaders can learn from the Seattle Seahawks

Now is probably not the most fashionable time to praise the Seattle Seahawks. Last weekend’s Super Bowl saw the team give up their lead with 2:02 left on the clock and proceed to come up just short of winning by throwing an interception in the last minute. But individual failures do not make of break a team. The long game is what matters, and the Seahawks have demonstrated two years running that they are among the most elite, dependably top-performing franchises in the league.

Below, I’ve outlined some characteristics of the Seahawks’ formula. No doubt, the team’s philosophy can seem a little hokey, but there is no denying that their transparent, competition-driven approach works. These insights should be of great interest to business leaders looking to maximize productivity at the lowest possible cost, and the lessons therein applicable to firms looking for better ways to find and manage talent, develop a supportive culture and align their organization around a central mission.

Recruiting talent

During recruitment, companies talk about their values and expectations — but often in an ad hoc or incoherent fashion. This is because many firms do not invest sufficient time and energy in identifying what kind of organization they are. As a result, new hires often discover they’ve been sold a false bill of goods. This can result in reduced engagement and performance and, worse, increased turnover.

The Seahawks recruit differently. Here’s an excerpt from the brochure they provide to prospective players. According to Coach Pete Carroll,

“We wholeheartedly believe in competition in all aspects of our program, and the only way to compete is to show it on the field. We’re dedicated to giving all of our players a look to find out who they are and what they’re all about so we can field the best team possible.”

This document details a philosophy of competition that is clear and direct. It sets an accurate tone from the original point of contact, letting every prospect and their agents know what will be expected and how they will be measured. This simple step helps to mitigate the likelihood of unpleasant surprises down the road.

Managing talent

The fact that more and more can be measured now — both in terms of productivity levels and strategic success — can put managers under a microscope. This inevitably results in an adversarial, “what have you done for me lately” management style and a general risk aversion when it comes to decision-making. Needless to say, this in turn can lead to diminished long-term competitiveness, poor morale and, again, increased turnover.

Seahawks management takes a different tack. Despite poor play for much of the final game, Coach Carroll never wavered from his season-long game plan and reliance on all players in his line-up. He stayed loyal to key players such as Russell Wilson. And, he was not shy about using new players like Chris Matthews. While Mr. Wilson was mediocre during most of the first half, he did lead the team back strong in the late 2nd quarter to the end of the game.Mr. Matthews led the Seahawks in passing reception yards in the final game, despite not catching a pass for the entire season and being a shoe salesman not too long ago.

Rewarding talent

Recruiters tend to bring certain assumptions to the table regarding what kind of person is best for a certain job. These biases often include a preference for candidates from a certain school, possessing a certain degree or having had certain work experience. These assumptions usually go unchecked because many organizations lack the performance measurement systems necessary to uncover what actually works — and what doesn’t. This can result in qualified, and often less expensive, talent being overlooked. Just as troublesome, it can result in weak performance being unwittingly rewarded in terms of hires, promotions and salaries.

The Seahawks, on the other hand, are hard-nosed and pragmatic in their approach. Everyone must compete for their positions every day, regardless of where they come from or what salary they command. Crucially, the Seahawks aren’t afraid of putting un-drafted and untested free agents on the field. These players tend to put in their best effort in exchange for the opportunity. For example, they signed Russell Wilson, who many teams passed up on because he was considered too small, for less than $1-million per year. He went on to be an all-star quarterback. This not only provides the Seahawks with more affordable talent, it motivates their big guns to avoid resting on their laurels and to continue to demonstrate why they deserve to be on the field.

For more information on our services and work please visit the Quanta Consulting Inc. web site.  Also, please follow me on Twitter: @MitchellOsak

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