Digitally disrupting your company


Disrupt or be disrupted. This is the stark choice with which many senior managers are faced as emerging technologies and corresponding behaviours continue to reshape the marketplace.

Given the choice, most would understandably choose the former. The problem, of course, is that many organizations are crippled by organizational inertia. Market leaders and public companies are particularly vulnerable, as they tend to possess deeply entrenched operational structures, revenue models and cultural values. Either they don’t see the change coming or, more likely, can’t muster the organizational willpower required to do anything about it.

Case study: OLG

Five years ago, Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corp. found themselves in this position. Senior management observed that Millennials are less interested than previous generations in gambling the old-fashioned way. Natives of the Internet and accustomed to the conveniences afforded by smartphones, many were turning away from corner-store kiosks and toward online poker and other “casino-style” games that can be found easily, if illegally, on the Internet.

At the same time, the OLG found itself struggling to hold on to its existing customers. Not only were fewer Americans visiting their casinos, U.S. competitors were also making inroads in luring Canadians south of the border. Both trends spelled a slow slip into irrelevance for the crown corporation.

So they decided to do something about it.

Rather than merely mitigate risk, senior management sought to develop a digital strategy that would enable them to capitalize on these trends. They began by asking the following questions:

  1. What business are we in?
  2. What business should we be in?
  3. How can technology facilitate this transformation?

What they concluded was that they are in the lottery and gaming business, not (merely) the casino and scratch-card business. “OLG’s goal is to provide the games our customers want to play where they want to play them,” says Tom Marinelli, OLG’s acting president and CEO. “As we transform, our advances in technology are giving us a new opportunity to continue to be relevant to our customers.”

In response to changing customer needs and demands, the OLG began work on an online lottery and gaming hub. Set to launch this year, PlayOLG.ca will provide online gaming and sell digital lottery tickets. The idea is that by matching or exceeding the experiences offered elsewhere on the Web in a manner that is both secure and legal, the OLG will be able to attract younger adult customers and fend off illegal international competitors.

The execution strategy for PlayOLG.ca was informed by paying close attention to how the Internet and mobile technology are affecting the gaming and lottery business at large. In doing so, they identified and implemented a set of best practices. Here’s what they came up with:

  • Place technology-savvy leaders at the forefront. For the OLG, this meant selecting Mr. Marinelli, who has a background in both IT and operations, to lead the transformation.
  • Consider change holistically, involving all stakeholders. Because the lottery and gaming industry is highly complex and regulated, all aspects and implications must be considered when implementing any kind of change. The concept of “responsible gambling,” for example, must be applied to all customer-facing products.
  • Communicate plans regularly to employees. With up to 30% of the OLG’s 8,000 employees unionized, poor communication could very well spell disaster.

Even with these pivots, the future of the OLG is uncertain. Currently they’re seeking new ownership, with both Bell and Rogers rumoured to be potential buyers. But whether the OLG stays public or goes private, going digital will surely go a long way toward ensuring the long-term viability of the organization.

Takeaways

Many of the lessons learned by the OLG can be of value to other organizations similarly faced with disruption. To undertake a digital transformation initiative of your own, you should begin by asking yourself the following questions:

  1. How can a new technology help improve operations or better serve customers?
  2. How difficult will deployment be, and at what long-term cost?

To answer these questions, you’ll need to develop a 360-degree view of both your organization and the market in which you are situated.

  • Where are we going as a company?
  • What capabilities and organizational model do we need to adopt in order to capitalize on the new technology?
  • How will customers and other channels be affected by the new technology?
  • What is the potential economic impact of the new technology?
  • What can we learn from other firms’ experiences?

Regardless of what your answers are, any digital transformation of a scope similar to that of the OLG will require the following: support from the board, enterprise-level expertise in adopting and managing emerging technology, a clear understanding of where profitability comes from and a functioning capital and resource allocation process. Above all, however, a successful digital transformation requires just two things: strong senior management and a willingness to change.

For more information on our services or work, please visit the Quanta Consulting Inc., web site.

Advertisements

No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: