3 ways to maximize sponsorship ROI


If you followed the World Cup, you would have noticed the many corporate sponsors of the event, the teams and players (i.e. the properties). Sponsoring the right property can give a brand a major boost in awareness and appeal. However, having the wrong approach or property could waste the investment and compromise the firm’s brand image. Fortunately, there are some best practices to follow to maximize a sponsorship’s potential.

Corporate sponsorship is big business. Annual global investment exceeds $25-billion, growing at almost 10% each year. Sports — teams, events and athletes — make up the majority of spend. Growth is being driven by an increase in the number of new properties like rock bands, festivals and charities, the rising value of some properties as well as the growing practice of tiering sponsorship support (think platinum, gold, silver levels).

Sponsorships are an important way for many companies to get their brands in front of elusive, skeptical and mobile consumers who are regularly bombarded by numerous marketing messages. Opportunities can range from naming rights on a stadium and client relationship events to limited edition products and custom advertising programs. Sponsorships can significantly build a business (think Michael Jordan and Nike) or hurt a brand image, as was the case when Kate Moss’ personal issues led to major problems for Chanel and H&M. How do you ensure you get the most value from this powerful but risky marketing tool?

The best programs get three things right:

1.  Align the opportunity to business objectives

Given the range of properties, you need to use a thorough process to filter and analyze the sponsorships to find strategic congruence between the property, brand and target audience. When affinities are lacking, the opportunity and investment could be wasted. In a high-profile program we studied, a mismatch between the firm’s customer base (women, 18-49) and the properties’ core audience (men 18-24) led to a lower than expected ROI.

2.  Promote the sponsorship

Companies often spend a lot of money acquiring sponsorship rights but very little on the promotional support that would magnify its impact. Various studies suggest that underperforming programs spend less than $1 on promotion for every $1 spent on sponsorship rights. The lack of marketing support may trace back to management neglect or the need to limit spending after paying for the rights. In one case, a client of ours believed that becoming a concert sponsor alone would drive their business. Though the sponsorship was deemed a success, management acknowledged that a lack of promotional support resulted in the firm missing out on millions of dollars in merchandise sales. Conversely, higher performing companies spend more than $1.50 in promotion for every $1 in sponsorship. Not only do these firms magnify their sponsorship investment but they also integrate their properties within their marketing mix.

3.  Evaluate performance

Despite the importance of sponsorships, many firms do not effectively quantify the impact of their expenditures. This is not surprising given the difficulty of linking sales directly to sponsorships. Successful companies use a variety of approaches. The simplest way is to survey customers, partners and employees on program impact and lessons learned. Firms can also tie total program spending to key metrics such as unaided awareness or purchase intent, and then link them to sales using regression analysis. The most sophisticated approach uses econometrics to ascertain links between programs, awareness and sales, and then isolate the impact of sponsorships from other marketing and sales activities.

Maximizing sponsorship value can be a challenge, especially when firms have multiple properties, customer segments and marketing tactics. BMO Financial Group is a major sponsor that has figured this out. The bank successfully operates a North American-wide program with dozens of properties and partners including: NBA Basketball (Toronto, Chicago), NHL Hockey (St. Louis, Chicago) Major League Soccer (Toronto, Montreal), amateur sports and the Calgary Stampede.

The Bank looks at sponsorships strategically, with a proven approach to identifying, evaluating and managing sponsorship deals. Each property — whether it is in sports, arts or regional events — aims to reach diverse customer segments within local communities as well as appeal to broader national audiences. The bank magnifies the impact of its sponsorships by integrating its elements with other marketing activities. For example, BMO was able to quickly maximize its sponsorship of the Toronto Raptors during their 2014 playoff run by increasing media advertising and launching a new Twitter campaign.

Finally, BMO sees a deal signing as the beginning of an iterative win-win relationship between the parties and not an end in itself. Justine Fedak, senior vice-president and head of brand, advertising and sponsorships for BMO, emphasizes the importance of long-term partnership. “Similar to marriage, a sponsorship begins with a mutual understanding of shared values and then evolves over time. Gone are the days when you slap a logo on something and walk away.”

For more information on our services and work, please visit the Quanta Consulting Inc. web site.

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